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"A multitude of people and a shortage of food." The displaced people in Gumbo are seeking help

(Juba, South Sudan) - The outbreak of violence started on 7 July in the South Sudan capital, Juba. They ended (or at least ceased temporarily) from midnight on 11 July, with the ceasefire. Since 12 July several foreign nationals, with the diplomatic assistance of their respective countries, have started to leave. The streets are apparently open and vehicles are beginning to move back to the city. But it is deserted, with hospitals, schools, factories, shops ... all closed.

Fr David Tulimelli of the Salesian mission of Gumbo on the outskirts of Juba, ventured out on Tuesday and managed to purchase a small amount of supplies at a high price. The mission compound is still occupied by a crowd of between 3,000 and 4,000 people - not counting infants - and most are women and children. Those who live nearby have returned to their homes, although some of them are still eating and sleeping at the mission where they feel safe.

Those left in the mission are the people from the areas of the city most affected (Rock City, Muniki, Jebel Kujur, Check Point and Gudele ...). Many of them tried to return to their homes but found them completely destroyed or looted. "Don Bosco Gumbo Mission is trying to cater to the needs of the people with all available resources and personnel. All the religious communities in the compound (Salesians, FMA Sisters and Caritas Sisters) joined hands together to assist the people with shelter, medical care, sanitation, food and water. But our resources are running short and soon we will exhaust our supply unless the Divine Providence or international assistance come to our rescue" says the Salesian Fr CJ Shyjan.

A woman staying at the Salesian mission says: "The people who allowed us in here have given us a shelter where we can stay. However, we have no food and we do not have the minimum necessary even to sleep: there are rooms, but there are no mats. There is no food and a lot of people. The classrooms are not big enough to hold everyone. If someone could help us with supplies or send material to cover us ... We don’t have what we need such as cooking facilities.”

Finally Fr Shyjan adds: "Don Bosco Wau still has about 5000 people accommodated in their compound who need similar kind of assistance"




   Republished from ANS:  www.infoans.org


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